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"When I pitched up for my first day..."

Published

1986 (Nov) - 1994 (Jul) (UK Edition)


Editors

Dan Goldstein, Tim Goodyer, Nigel Lord

Published issues

91

Owned issues

90

Active on site

35

Scanned issues

90

Needed issues

1

Remembering MT
by Tim Goodyer (former MT Editor)

When I pitched up for my first day on the staff of Music Technology in 1985, I had been running a keyboard rig characterised by a Minimoog, Jupiter 8, Clavinet and Wurlitzer piano. I was also using a good selection of footpedals. I had a TR808 and TR727, and my Atari ST/Creator sequencer setup. I’d been in numerous recording studios, from the demo studio/big room tradition, and had glimpsed the possibilities of the personal multitrack recorder.

The keyboard player’s world was changing. It was exhilarating and it was scary.

Two years as MT’s Music Editor put a succession of artists in front of me – from synth-pop bands, through studio recluses and ‘non-musicians’, to modern classical experimentalists – many of whom were shaping both the music and the tech. A further five as Editor proper gave the best seat to watch technology and music go through some truly seismic changes, and I shared it with truly great staff and contributors.

Together, we watched the birth, adolescence and evolution of MIDI. We watched ‘alternative’ synthesis architectures join subtractive synthesis – FM, Linear Arithmetic, additive... We watched sampling imprint its schizophrenic character on replacing both traditional instruments and traditional means of making music. We watched the economics of music making turned over. We watched major recording studios close, and sequencers become digital audio workstations. We watched the reinvention of the DJ and the ascent of dance music.

And we wrote about it, at length and in detail. Before MT, magazine work was unexplored territory for me, and without the faith (and subsequent tuition) of editor Dan Goldstein, I wouldn’t be writing this now. I also had the pleasure of working with and learning from the greatly missed Simon Trask. Seeing my work and that of the MT team live on as a historical resource is a great thing.


Tim Goodyer
Fast-and-Wide.com

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"We quickly dismissed the idea as foolhardy..."



Published

1985 (Nov) - Current (Still publishing)


Editors

Ian Gilby, Paul Ireson, Paul White

Published issues *

98

Owned issues

98

Active on site

19

Scanned issues

97

Needed issues

1

* We are collecting Sound On Sound issues up to Dec 1993.
Sound On Sound archives from 1994 onwards are available
from the Sound On Sound website...

Founding Sound On Sound
by Paul & Ian Gilby (former HSR, SOS Editor, Co-founders SOS)

Soundtrack? "Mmm, nice play on words..."
Synthetix? "Nah, people will think it's a haberdashery magazine..."
Recording? "Simple and to the point..."
Multitracker? "Getting better..."

Two hours later, my brother Paul and I were still thinking up names for our dream magazine when we stuck our favourite Bill Nelson album on the turntable and stopped to make another cup of tea. Glancing at the album sleeve, inspiration struck.

"What about 'Sound On Sound', I enquired? "That's the one!" confirmed Paul.

And that's how, way back in May 1985 in a rented bungalow in rural Cambridgeshire, the monthly magazine that recently celebrated its 30th anniversary came to be called Sound On Sound.

Looking back, it seems like only yesterday when two young, enthusiastic lads resigned from their editorial jobs because they were at loggerheads with a publisher who did not understand their vision of a magazine that would encapsulate the converging worlds of recording and music technology.

That's what we were interested in, and it was obvious to us back then at the birth of MIDI that it was only a matter of time before tape recorders were replaced by digital sequencers with random access, ample capacity and resolution to record entire performances, as well as control the entire mix. How could you publish a magazine about recording and not include MIDI sequencers?

So we left our jobs and signed on the dole. Two weeks passed and our rent became due, and that's when 'Red Cross food parcels' and financial subsidies from our parents commenced and we quickly realised that we had to get another job. Encouraged by our father, the obvious solution was to start our own magazine!

We quickly dismissed the idea as foolhardy and a guaranteed way to make ourselves bankrupt, as we knew nothing about running a company, but the seeds were sown that night as we lay asleep, dreaming of what might be. Next morning, we awoke filled with an ingrained sense of passion for the subject that still underpins the magazine today.

The November inaugural issue of Sound On Sound hit the UK streets on October 18th 1985, backed by a TV advertising campaign that aired within Channel 4's cult music programme, 'The Tube'. Tina Turner should have headlined the show that week, but due to illness was replaced last minute by Ultravox lead singer Midge Ure (interviewed and featured on our front cover), whose first solo single had just leapt up the charts to No.1. We couldn't have planned a better launch campaign, and Sound On Sound Issue 1 flew off the newsagent's shelves and into history!

Sound On Sound is very much a team effort, and we have been very lucky over the years to attract some of the most talented individuals in the industry. I cannot let this opportunity pass without thanking and praising all past and present SOS staff and contributors, our loyal readers and advertisers, for it is your contributions and support that have helped shape SOS and make it what it is today: the most respected, authoritative publication in its field. We're immensely proud of that achievement.


Ian Gilby, Paul Gilby
Co-founders, Sound On Sound


Published

1981 (Mar) - 1986 (Oct)


Editors

Mike Beecher, Dan Goldstein

Published issues

68

Owned issues

68

Active on site

12

Scanned issues

68

Needed issues

0


Published

1983 (Sep) - 1994 (Jul) (UK Edition)


Editors

Mike Beecher, Ian Gilby, Paul White, Dan Goldstein

Published issues

130

Owned issues

70

Active on site

4

Scanned issues

70

Needed issues

60

Joining HSR
by Paul White (former HSR Editor)

I joined Home Studio Recording in 1984 as technical editor. My previous career had been in electronics so in addition to writing reviews, my role included designing an electronics project each month for the readers to build. I ran a studio at home based on an open-reel eight-track machine at the time and also played live, which I still continue to do. I’ve suffered for my music so now I make sure everybody else does too!

In 1984 Ian Gilby was editor of Home Studio Recording and his brother Paul deputy editor but they fell out with the magazine owner after he offered them a monumentally insulting pay rise and left, leaving either myself or the guy who cleaned the offices to take over as editor. I don’t think he wanted it. So, with 11 days to go and an empty filing cabinet, I wrote nearly all the May issue.

This arrangement worked out well and we built up a good team including Debbie Poyser and Derek Johnson, both of whom later migrated to Sound On Sound along with myself. I really enjoyed my time at Home Studio Recording where we still made up magazines the old-school way with waxed paper and often worked through the night to meet deadlines. As the magazine started to appeal to more pro users, I changed the name to Home and Studio Recording.

Skip a few years and Ian and Paul Gilby had established Sound On Sound as a rival to Home Studio Recording and to Electronics and Music Maker as they covered both recording and synths in the same mag. There were rumours that Home Studio Recording and the other Music Maker titles were to be sold to Future Publishing, so in 1991 a few of us left and joined Sound On Sound. That was around 25 years ago — and I’m still there. Well, it’s much better than a ‘real' job!


Paul White
Editor, Sound On Sound

Magazines we are collecting include

Music Technology
Home & Studio Recording
Sound On Sound
Electronics & Music Maker
Making Music
Recording Musician


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