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The Roland Studio.

FIRSTMAN INTERNATIONAL SYN PULS/SD-1. This drum synthesiser has its controls positioned round the circular solid foam pad. The synthesiser has five sections: VCO-1; VCO-2 which doubles as an LFO; VCF; VCA; and SWEEP which is used to give changes in pitch and tone — the harder you beat the pad the larger the variation. The Synpuls is powered by two 9V batteries.

From Firstman Corporation, (Contact Details).

The NOVATRON Double Manual Mk V (with cover removed). Yes, you are right — this is the successor of the original Mellotron! Unfortunately, due to a mix-up somewhere along the line, the latter name was sold to an American. This version and the 400SM Single Manual model are the only instruments now being made and are still in the 'unique' category, producing sounds from tapes that have the actual recorded instrument. All kinds of effects are available to order (e.g. Paul McCartney had bagpipe phrases from 'Mull of Kintyre' put on to different keys), although the most popular sounds are brass, strings, flutes and the impressive choir.

From Streetly Electronics Ltd, (Contact Details).

'AUDIOS' EFFECTS UNIT. This is a state-of-the-art, all purpose effects unit. The scope of effects and sound 'experiences' that it is capable of creating stretches from barely audible texture alterations to full orchestral sound generated by one vocal solo. The three main sections are a sound storage memory, a transposer and a time delay unit. The Audios is stereophonic and some of the possibilities are: phasing, flanging, hyperflanging, sound storage for transposed playback, pinpointed memory recall by program keys and pedals, sound depth enhancement, different delay times for each channel, vibrato, double stereo phasing, pre-programmable transposition intervals, natural vibrato by pre-selectable attack-decay, and concise setting of transposition intervals and delay times through the 4-digit digital display. Rather impressive!

From R. Barth KG, (Contact Details).

SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS POLY-SEQUENCER This sequencer, available as a separate unit or as an addition to the Prophet-10, was designed to be simple to use. but no compromises were made in its capability or flexibility. The sequencer records up to six 'real time' sequences; the exact notes and timing being recorded (total storage capability is over 2.500 notes). The facilities include editing, single-stepping, external clock and transposition. There is also an internal 'Mini' digital cassette to store the sequences on! One of the most attractive features is the possibility of setting up automatic program changes in a sequence allowing note groups to be linked in specific sequences.

From Sequential Circuits, (Contact Details).

OBERHEIM OB-Xa. The Oberheim OB-Xa programmable polyphonic synthesiser represents the latest step in Oberheim's philosophy of 'evolutionary product development'. The OB-Xa is an expansion of the OB-X with programmable split keyboard and doubling option, which allows the synthesist to play two different sounds on each section of the keyboard. By selecting different program combinations and mixing them with the balance control, many new complex sounds are possible. The OB-Xa has an additional four-pole filter and modulation facilities. It is supplied with 32 different preset sounds and 8 split/double combinations. As with the OB-X, it is available in four, six or eight voice configurations.

From Oberheim, (Contact Details)

"SOUND AROUND" from Lemon Studio Sound. Lemon Studio Sound have provided a different approach to the instrument amplifier. The Sound Around cabinet has an internal 200 Watt amplifier with direct and effects input channels plus a bass speaker and horn on all four sides! The dimensions are a modest 55 x 42 x 42 cm.

From Lemon Studio Sound, (Contact Details).

VAN ZALINGEN BASS. This acoustic, electronically amplified string-bass claims advantages over its traditional counterpart by virtue of its special construction. The slim shape makes it more portable and musical characteristics offer easy to play high notes, no 'wolf' tones, equal volume for the whole instrument range and yet still retaining the acoustic double-bass sound.

From Alpha Musical Instruments, (Contact Details).

HH P73 ELECTRONIC PIANO. Many of the electronic pianos arriving on the market in recent years have not been well received by discerning musicians. HH have tried to put 'life' into the sound by use of advanced computer technology. The P73 contains a microprocessor which produces rich complex voicings and the tonal structure of each note is modified throughout its duration as in an acoustic instrument. The piano has five different voices: Piano 1 'Normal Piano', Piano 2 'Stage Piano', Piano 3 'Jazz Piano', Piano 4 'Grand Piano' and Clavichord. The output is in stereo with panned tremolo and a 'space' control which combines phasing and chorus effects. The piano is complete with a sturdy case, legs and a dual footswitch for sustain and volume boost.

From HH Electronic, (Contact Details).

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Electronics & Music Maker - Copyright: Music Maker Publications (UK), Future Publishing.


Electronics & Music Maker - Jun 1981


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