• APRS '83 Exhibition Report
  • APRS '83 Exhibition Report

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APRS '83 Exhibition Report

UK's annual studio products event


This year's international exhibition of the Association of Professional Recording Studios was held at the now established venue, the Kensington Exhibition Centre in Derry Street, London. From June 22-24 over 90 exhibitors from all over the world displayed equipment and products that covered virtually every aspect of the audio-visual industry. Here we present a varied selection of products that were on show, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced.


The 1983 APRS show was Otari's first since the inception of its UK subsidiary last year. On show were several new professional tape machines including the MX-5D50B stereo recorder shown, which features a micro-controlled transport which facilitates interfacing with video synch systems.


Tannoy displayed their new Broadcast Monitor 8 (left), a two-way bass reflex loudspeaker that provides the quality of sound reproduction necessary for 'on air' monitoring, as well as their popular Stratford, SRM 10B and Little Red monitors.

Steve Brown of Applied Micro systems demonstrating the Spin Time, an add-on digital tape timer costing around £80 suitable for most semi-pro recorders. He is holding the CM50 autolocator, one of the cheapest available with full features, that can be used with semi-pro multitrack recorders.


Exhibiting for the first time were Pilkington Fibre Optic Technologies who showed this new mixed-multiplexing system capable of taking inputs from analogue controls and data interfaces, multiplexing them and transmitting them over a single optical cable.


Roland's Rick Cannell was on hand to demonstrate the Amdek range of computer peripherals which included the DXY-100 plotter and CMU-800 Compu Music system.


HHB were showing Sequential Circuits' Pro-Fx 500 rack-mounting modular signal processor. Modules available include the digital delay, reverb 4/2 mixer and Para EQ. The system controller remembers the effect patches which can be stored as programs and selected, or saved on tape.


Alan Townsend of Roland (right) point out the virtues of the MC-202 Micro-Composer to an interested electro-musician.


Rebis Audio's extremely popular RA200 Series of modular signal processors include HighCom noise reduction, ADT, noise gate and line-up oscillator amongst its 21 available modules.


Psionics 4 channel 19" rack-mounting noise gates with individual gain, threshold, attack, release and depth controls. Korg SDD 3000 delay below.


New products from Alpine included the AL-85, AL-90 professional stereo cassette decks with digital readout and EQ, bias, and level calibration. Also on show was the PCM-based AP 6000 digital audio processor.


Neal 4 channel model 340 cassette recorder.


On the Scenic Sounds Equipment stand you could try out the new Lexicon 200 digital reverberator using a Linn Drum. The model 200 is a low cost stereo digital reverb system in a convenient rack mount package with full program storage, room dimension controls and the latest Lexicon software. All for around £4,000!


The stylish Syncon M24 multitrack was the focus of attention on the Allen & Heath Brennell/MBI stand, which also featured the System 8 range of mixers and Syncom Series B desks. Pictured are Ermanno Parazzini (Italian agent for Professional Equipment SRL) and Neil Hausser (AHB Managing Director).


Audio-Technica mics were demonstrated on the John Hornby Skewes stand including this talkback mic with built-in gooseneck, the ATM 83G. Features include XLR connector, low impedance (600 ohm), undirectional characteristic — all for £49 including VAT.


Paul Chin (Sales) of Future Film Developments.

Shure's amusing display for the new SM-10 microphone headset, purpose-built for vocoder users.


Cable Technology's display featured a multitude of professional connectors and cables, for stage and studio use.



Previous Article in this issue

Studio Focus

Next article in this issue

Over The Road Show Report


Electronics & Music Maker - Copyright: Music Maker Publications (UK), Future Publishing.

 

Electronics & Music Maker - Aug 1983

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Show Report

Previous article in this issue:

> Studio Focus

Next article in this issue:

> Over The Road Show Report


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