Magazine Archive

Home -> Magazines -> Issues -> Articles in this issue -> View

Sound Advice

Our regular column devoted to readers' hints and tips about their instruments, equipment, software, recording and playing techniques.


If you've discovered any special techniques or tricks on your instruments or recording equipment that might help other readers, send them in to us. The sender of the best tip each month will win a super prize. This month, it's a free copy of Craig Anderton's highly informative book MIDI FOR MUSICIANS.

TIP OF THE MONTH



BPM Delays In Sync


When using computers in music (I use the Steinberg Pro-16 for the Commodore 64/128), one is always given the tempo of the piece in Beats Per Minute (BPM). I have written a BASIC program which generates a list of values in milliseconds for various BPM settings. When these are set up on a digital delay, the resulting delays will then be perfectly in sync with the tempo of the music. The delays can be set to various musical note intervals - quarter-note, eighth-note, triplet, etc - and these are listed in the accompanying table.

Having worked it out, I wondered why I had never thought of it before. The effect of being able to dial in a perfectly 'in-sync' delay is well worth the effort.
Steve Thompson, Whitley Bay.

TEMPO DELAY VALUES IN MILLISECONDS
BPM QUARTER EIGHTH 16TH 4TRIPLET 8TRIPLET 16TRIPLET
85 705 352 176 529 264 132
86 697 348 174 523 261 130
87 689 344 172 517 258 129
88 681 340 170 511 255 127
89 674 337 168 505 252 126
90 666 333 166 500 250 125
91 659 329 164 491 247 123
92 652 326 163 489 244 122
93 645 322 161 483 241 120
94 638 319 159 478 239 119
95 631 315 157 473 236 118
96 625 312 156 468 234 117
97 618 309 154 463 231 115
98 612 306 153 459 229 114
99 606 303 151 454 227 113
100 600 300 150 450 225 112
101 594 297 148 445 222 111
102 588 294 147 441 220 110
103 582 291 145 436 218 109
104 576 288 144 432 216 108
105 571 285 142 428 214 107
106 566 283 141 424 212 106
107 560 280 140 420 210 105
108 555 277 138 416 208 104
109 550 275 137 412 206 103
110 545 272 136 409 204 102
111 540 270 135 405 202 101
112 535 267 133 401 200 100
113 530 265 132 398 199 99
114 526 263 131 394 197 98
115 521 260 130 391 195 97
116 517 258 129 387 193 96
117 512 256 128 384 192 96
118 508 254 127 381 190 95
119 504 252 126 378 189 94
120 500 250 125 375 187 93
121 495 247 123 371 185 92
122 491 245 122 368 184 92
123 487 243 121 365 182 91
124 483 241 120 362 181 90
125 480 240 120 360 180 90
126 476 238 119 357 178 89
127 472 236 118 354 177 88
128 468 234 117 351 175 87
129 465 232 116 348 174 87
130 461 230 115 346 173 86
131 458 229 114 343 171 85
132 454 227 113 340 170 85
133 451 225 112 338 169 84
134 447 223 111 335 167 83
135 444 222 111 332 166 83
136 441 220 110 330 165 82
137 437 218 109 328 164 82
138 434 217 108 326 163 81
139 431 215 107 323 161 80
140 428 214 107 321 160 80


Sample Transfer


Want to transfer samples from your Akai S900 to an X7000? Easy - connect your two MIDI cables to both instruments (In to Out, Out to In). Load a sample into the S900 that you want to send to the X7000, then go to the S900's Edit mode, shorten the sample to 32752, and reloop if necessary. Press the 0, On/+ and Off/- buttons simultaneously, then press the Down arrow button to initiate a sample dump from the S900 to the X7000. The X7000 should hopefully say 'Receiving Sample 1'. Save the sample to a 2.8-inch disk, then if desired, send over more samples and arrange them into programs.

It is also possible to send samples to the S900 from the X7000 by pushing the six black keys one at a time (starting from the bottom) and holding them down while you press the Save button on the X7000. This can be very useful for making backups, doing further editing, and for using the S900 to find the 'perfect loop'.
Bob Lewin, Bartlett, Tennessee.

DX7II - Yamaha reply...


I felt I must write in response to your 'Sound Advice' page in the November issue concerning DX7II Running Status.

Whilst the advice is correct concerning the possibility of missing notes if you use a computer or expander which does not recognise running status, it should be pointed out that the ability of the DX7II to use running status can be an enormous benefit. Using running status can save massive amounts of memory, especially if you use continuous controllers such as the Modulation Wheel and Pitch Bend in performance. As your column has pointed out, memory can be critical and any method which saves it will allow for more music to be recorded and this must be a great benefit to the musician. Of course, all Yamaha sequencers recognise running status, so there will be no loss of notes when using them with the DX7II (!).
Martin Tennant, Yamaha-Kemble, Milton Keynes.



Previous Article in this issue

A Day in the Life of a MIDI Studio

Next article in this issue

Great Audio Concepts


Sound On Sound - Copyright: SOS Publications Ltd.
The contents of this magazine are re-published here with the kind permission of SOS Publications Ltd.

 

Sound On Sound - Dec 1987

Feedback

Previous article in this issue:

> A Day in the Life of a MIDI ...

Next article in this issue:

> Great Audio Concepts


Help Support The Things You Love

mu:zines is the result of thousands of hours of effort, and will require many thousands more going forward to reach our goals of getting all this content online.

If you value this resource, you can support this project - it really helps!

Donations for November 2020
Issues donated this month: 1

New issues that have been donated or scanned for us this month.

Funds donated this month: £43.00

All donations and support are gratefully appreciated - thank you.

Please Contribute to mu:zines by supplying magazines, scanning or donating funds. Thanks!

Monetary donations go towards site running costs, and the occasional coffee for me if there's anything left over!
muzines_logo_02

Small Print

Terms of usePrivacy